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Android Jelly Bean 4.1 given to Android Open Source Project

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Jean-Baptiste Queru has announced that Android's latest version, 4.1 Jelly Bean, has been released to the Android Open Source Project. This is a major step for JB, and it allows anyone to get their hands on the source code and compile 4.1 into their own ROM.

Linaro Android doubles performance of AOSP

A build of Android from a non-profit organisation known as Linaro who specialize in software for ARM (the type of chip you’re more than likely running on your Android device(s)) can nearly double the performance of Android AOSP.

Here’s a video which shows you android AOSP on a BeagleBoard (an open-source board, similar to Raspberry Pi, but more expensive) vs Linaro Android which has lots of tiny optimizations on the CPU code to make it run really fast.

Google Pushes Source Code Of Android 4.0.4 (IMM76D) Into AOSP

aospSource code for Android 4.0.4 (AOSP tag android-4.0.4_r1.1), the latest incremental update with "a few hundred changes over 4.0.3," is being pushed to AOSP (Android Open Source Project) as we speak by JBQ, one of AOSP's main sourcerers (yes, I just made that word up).
This is excellent news for any ROM developers compiling their ROMs from AOSP (such as CyanogenMod) - chances are 4.0.4-based ROMs will start appearing very soon, maybe even tonight. Oh, and, of course, it's even more excellent news for custom ROM users (raise you hands).

Earlier today, official 4.0.4 updates got pushed out to the Motorola XOOM Wi-Fi and the GSM Nexus S. Hopefully, we'll be seeing a lot more of these official updates in the coming days - JBQ has only given us the standard disclaimer:

Gold For Android Developers: Add AOSP Source Code To Eclipse With The "Android Sources" Plugin

aospAs an Android developer, the first thing I do when I set up Eclipse with ADT on a new machine is hunt down the Android source for the API level I'm working on.

Developers should understand what I'm talking about, but for the rest of you - this priceless little addition to our development process means whenever we want to see just what exactly Android is doing at a certain point in our programs, we can actually take a peek.
In fact, I oftentimes gain more insight into how the code works (or why mine doesn't work) from looking at the source than from reading documentation. Go try that with iOS...

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